To evolve, or not to evolve? - that is the question

Author(s):

Molly J. Good; William W. Taylor

Journal or Book Title: Fisheries

Volume/Issue: 41/8

Page Number(s): 433-435

Year Published: 2016

Abstract:

Just last month, I (M. J. G.) found myself on the course of the Fifth Third River Bank Run in downtown Grand Rapids, Michigan, dodging marathon runners, spectators, and police of officers, as I attempted to maneuver myself from the outskirts of the city, through the marathon course, to the Amway Grand Plaza Hotel. It was there that I was planning to meet with my friend and former supervisor, Ralph Riley. Riley is an ecologist that I met 10 years ago. At that time, I was an outgoing and enthusiastic high school student, who was actively searching for opportunities and experiences that would help me learn more about and understand what I wanted to do professionally in the future. While in my guidance counselor’s office one day, I happened upon an application for a program dedicated to exposing students to scientific eld work and data collection and analysis through intensive, short-term research experiences. With support and encouragement from my high school biology teacher, I applied for and was fortunate to receive this once-in- a-lifetime opportunity through Earthwatch Institute’s Student Challenge Awards Program (SCAP). I still remember the day I opened my program acceptance letter, for my Dad gifted me with a larger-than-life-size (a trophy size!) rainbow trout mylar balloon. Working alongside Riley and a team of five other high school students from all over the country, I traveled to the Puget Sound, where I was trained on the spot and quickly put to work gathering data and information about the ecology and geomorphology of salmon-bearing streams in the Paci c Northwest.

DOI: 10.1080/03632415.2016.1219166

Publisher: AFS Press

Location: Bethesda, MD

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