shadow

Dec. 31, 2005

Ann E. Krause won the 2005 Albert S. Hazzard Award from the Michigan Chapter of the American Fisheries Society. The award is given in recognition of excellence in student research in fisheries or aquatic biology at a college or university in Michigan. She received the award for her dissertation, "The role of compartments in food-web structure and changes following biological invasions in southeast Lake Michigan."

shadow

June 29, 2005

Globalization is making it a small world, after all, and the costs of this newfound neighborliness are high.

Two internationally acclaimed scientists present sweeping evidence that China’s challenges – from polluted air and water to making and consuming goods to family life – already are making a big impact on the environment and human well-being in China and other parts of the world, including America and Europe.

shadow

Dec. 31, 2004

William W. Taylor received the Fisheries Excellence Award -- the highest honor that the North Central Division of the American Fisheries Society offers to a member who has made outstanding contributions to the fisheries profession. Taylor has devoted much of his professional life to fisheries research and conservation and is an exemplary recipient that the award attempts to recognize. The award was presented at the 65th annual Midwest Fisheries and Wildlife Conference on Dec. 13, 2004 in Indianapolis.

shadow

Feb. 14, 2004

They don’t call it biocomplexity for nothing.

The future of environmental policy lies in embracing ambiguity – in the understanding that the days of dreaming of isolated fixes to problems are over. The future, a Michigan State University ecologist told those at the American Associate for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) annual meeting here, is all about understanding that there are no simple solutions, or at least none that isolated.

shadow

May 22, 2003

A crucial part in the battle to prevent outbreaks of deadly disease across the world lies with ecologists, an MSU professor says.

Preserving biodiversity and wildlife habitats are at the foundation of global health, says Jianguo "Jack" Liu, an ecologist who is the lead author for a Policy Forum in the May 23 issue of Science magazine.

The article outlines ways to protect biodiversity in China's vast system of nature reserves. But Liu said the issues span farther than China and are vital to more than pandas and gingko trees.

shadow

April 5. 2001

The way to panda extinction may be paved with good intentions, a Michigan State study published in Science shows.

Panda habitat is being destroyed quicker inside the world's most high-profile protected nature reserve than in adjacent areas of China that are not protected. Moreover, the rates of destruction were higher after the reserve was established than before the reserve's creation, says Jianguo Liu, an associate professor of fisheries and wildlife at MSU.

shadow