shadow

Aug. 6, 2019

Where there’s a will to peddle soybeans in the global marketplace, there’s a way, even if a trade war creates roadblocks.

In the recent issue of the international open-access journal Sustainability, Michigan State University (MSU) scholars apply a new, more holistic way to examine global agricultural trade to better understand what’s going on when a country as enormous as China develops a big appetite for soybeans.

shadow

May 21, 2019

Globalization isn’t just a phenomenon of trade.  Tourists increasingly have become international jetsetters, bringing the promise of prosperity, threats to the nature they come to experience and lots of questions about how to strike a balance.

shadow

May 6, 2019

Lands that shelter forests have value often readily tallied by developers, but until now it’s been more difficult to prove the success of protecting those forested lands in pursuit of sustainability. That can put conservationists on the defense.

A group of scientists from Michigan State University (MSU) have focused on understanding what makes a protected area the most effective at preventing deforestation. Preserving forests means more trees to suck up greenhouse gasses, as well as prevent erosion, mitigate flooding, purify water and quell sandstorms.

shadow

May 5, 2019

A new book brings together leading experts on telecoupling and land-use, and features a chapter by CSIS scientists.

Telecoupling -- Exploring Land-Use Change in a Globalised World presents a comprehensive exploration of the emerging concept and framework of telecoupling and how it can help create a better understanding of land-use change in a globalised world.

shadow

April 30, 2019

Two papers by Michigan State University (MSU) scientists begin challenging a more simplistic, input/output view of natural resources in favor of a way that better reflected how the world really works.

That these natural resources don’t just flow or gush down pipelines.

That sometimes energy whisks across the world stored in the materials it produces. Sometimes water moves stored in crops it made grow.

shadow

March 28, 2019

For a five-year-old, the telecoupling framework is proving to be precocious.

What began as a research upstart in the crowded world of sustainability science, the research framework is becoming a standard to allow scientists from many different fields come to the same table to examine complicated challenges that span the globe. Telecoupling framework’s impact and future are examined in this month’s journal Sustainability.

shadow

March 21, 2019

Fulfilling the world’s growing energy needs summons images of oil pipelines, electric wires and truckloads of coal. But Michigan State University scientists show a lot of energy moves nearly incognito, embedded in the products of a growing society.

And that energy leaves its environmental footprint home.

shadow

Feb. 14, 2019

Master's degree student Tessaliz Quiles Delgado and PhD student Kelly Kapsar have been awarded support for their studies in conservation.

shadow

Feb. 1, 2019

Even as the world gets on the same sustainability page courtesy of the United Nation Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), those very goals can result in significant tradeoffs. Scientists suggest new ways to tackle unexpected or unintended consequences cropping up on the way to a better world at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting.

shadow

Dec. 18, 2018

Seabird watching off the tip of South America. Trekking through banana plantations in Laos. Dairy farming in the midwestern USA. Each once-local experience is now part of a global sustainability challenge.

As local becomes global, sustainability scientists are breaking down disciplinary barriers and joining in new ways to figure out survival. In the face of threats that transcend borders -- climate change, water and energy shortages, food insecurity, pollution flows – scientists themselves are shedding conventional limitations.

shadow