Events

Monday, October 24, 2016 (All day) - Thursday, October 27, 2016 (All day)

The upcoming third OSM 2016 will be organized by the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences under the coordination of Scientific Steering Committee (SSC) and International Project Office (IPO) of GLP.

The aim of GLP 3rd OSM 2016 is to bring together the international research community working on land system issues. The OSM will highlight the width and scope of ongoing land system research, strengthen the highly interdisciplinary land system community, inspire new research and facilitate review, theory building and extrapolation.

Monday, October 10, 2016 - 7:00pm - 9:00pm
  • Dessert with discussion flierLearn about the threats climate change poses to global ecosystems and human well-being through its effects on wildlife and plant species
  • Gain a globalized perspective on climate change through Dr.
Monday, September 19, 2016 - 5:00pm - 9:00pm

This program will be similar to the Bill Earth Youth Fishing program. John Hesse, Mark Stephens and Dr. Sung Lee, are devleoping a new program to engage international students (and their children) in fishing locally, teaching them how and where to fish, and how to cook and clean the fish. Voluneers are needed to help with the Sept. 19th workshop for the adult participants and will cover the mechanics of fishing and cooking fish. In October, the particpants (and their children) will put their new skills to use at a local lake.

Sunday, September 18, 2016 - 1:00pm - 5:00pm

Interested in getting involved in the green building industry? Opportunities are plentiful in the field of sustainable design and LEED is at its forefront.

LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) is a green-rating point system. The more energy efficient and sustainable a building is, the more points it will earn. To date, this course and its materials have helped more than 5,000 students pass their respective exams.
 

Saturday, September 10, 2016 - 9:00am - 12:00pm

Join the Ingham Conservation District (ICD) and a wonderful group of local partners in a multi-river cleanup in and around the City of Lansing. We are seeking volunteers to help clean sections of the Red Cedar River, Grand River and Sycamore Creek. Sign up today and be a part of the pollution solution! We will meet at City Market. Lunch is included. Please dress for safety with close-toed shoes, long pants and long sleeves. We also ask volunteers to bring their own work gloves if possible.

Sunday, April 3, 2016 - 9:00am - 5:00pm

Landscapes across the world are increasingly interconnected, both ecologically and socioeconomically. To understand and manage such complex interconnections, a new integrated framework of telecoupling is proposed (www.csis.msu.edu/telecoupling). Telecouplings are socioeconomic and ecological interactions between multiple coupled human and natural systems (e.g., landscapes) over distances. They occur during trade, water transfer, payment for ecosystem services, foreign investment, migration, and tourism.

Monday, March 21, 2016 - 10:00am - 11:30am

Pandas and People: Coupling Human and Natural Systems for Sustainability

Jack LiuGiant pandas are an endangered species and conservation icon. This talk will highlight the interdisciplinary research that addresses complex dynamics between humans and the natural world.

Tuesday, February 9, 2016 - 3:00pm - 4:00pm

An Analysis of Public Hearings and Meetings for the Construction of Highways and Related Infrastructure in Cave and Karst Ecosystems, Three Case Studies: Texas, Kentucky and Puerto Rico

Wednesday, January 27, 2016 - 11:00am - 11:20am

ABSTRACT: The sustainability of freshwater fisheries is increasingly affected by modifications to terrestrial and aquatic environments that influence water quality, quantity, and ecosystem productivity. Drivers of ecological change include warming air temperatures, changes in precipitation patterns, instream habitat alteration, and invasive species.

Monday, January 25, 2016 - 3:20pm - 3:40pm

ABSTRACT: Aquatic based zoonotic diseases (e.g., fish diseases) pose a threat to fish populations and the livelihoods of people that depend on those fish populations. Although in general they do not pose a great risk to humans, fish diseases pose a risk to the environment; recreational, commercial, charter, and tribal fishing; and the culture of fishing. Besides the natural movement of fish pathogens, humans play a role in the transmission of fish pathogens between bodies of water.