Inland Fisheries and Global Food Security: Can We Gather Insight from Land-based Agricultural Systems?

Inland Fisheries and Global Food Security:  Can We Gather Insight from Land-based Agricultural Systems?

Steven Pueppke

Oral presentation

Inland fisheries are among the most underappreciated contributors to food security in developing countries.  Fish harvest usually occurs at small scale, often just for local consumption.  If markets do exist, they are primitive and fragmented, and fishermen lack access to market intelligence.  Data are scarce and unreliable, too, and so fisheries are rarely high on the agendas of funders and others committed to reducing poverty and enhancing food production in food-insecure regions of the world.  With an eye toward the rapid proliferation of new technologies, land-oriented agricultural experts are devoting increasing attention to redesign of traditional crop-based value chains.  There is new emphasis on entrepreneurial and management skills, unconventional sources of talent, and achievement of 3P value—people, planet, and profit.  Experimentation is also underway with concepts such as Living Labs, which promote real world, innovation and learning that is focused on users.  Rapid population growth in urban areas is being viewed not just as a challenge, but also as an opportunity for agriculture to deliver more services to the city than just food.  By attracting the attention of businesses, urbanization also presents an opportunity to collaborate with firms to create shared value.  These are powerful drivers with the potential to create equally powerful synergies and learning across food systems, including those reliant on fish.  

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