Fish

May 7, 2016

To effectively manage fish populations, you need to know where fish come from – both literally, and more philosophically.

Andrew Carlson, a PhD student at Michigan State University’s Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability, has published two papers that fill knowledge gaps in understanding the conditions which best nurture and sustain fish populations.

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Feb. 9, 2016

No longer satisfied to be washed out by epic seas and vast oceans, the world’s lakes, rivers, streams, canals, reservoirs and other land-locked waters continue a push to be recognized – and properly managed – as a global food security powerhouse.

In an article today by Environmental Reviews, authors, which include six who are either currently affiliated with Michigan State University (MSU) and/or are alumni, offers the first global review of the value of inland fish and fisheries.

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Jan. 26, 2015

Michigan State University partnered with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations in Rome to bring 212 people from 45 countries to discuss ways to make fish a competitive part of global development, from the Great Lakes that surround Michigan to the Amazon and Vietnam’s Mekong Delta. The Global Conference on Inland Fisheries is Jan.

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Jan. 27, 2014

Inland fishing – the powerful yet quieter sister to the large, salty marine aquaculture powerhouse – has gained what experts say is a much-needed visibility boost this as the first partnership between Michigan State University (MSU) and the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations goes on in Rome.

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Abby LynchBlogger: Abigail Lynch: PhD student

The World Fisheries Congress is essentially the Olympics of fisheries conferences with more than 1,000 delegates from around the world here to present on topics related to sustainable fisheries. 

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Blogger: Sue Nichols, assistant director -- strategic communication

I sorta blame restaurants  – from Red Lobster to the Friday fish fries to those honkin’ buffets.

They make fish look so endless. Every day’s a feast, and the shear bounty seems to assure it’ll be that way forever.

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July 21, 2011

Bill Taylor, University Distinguished professor in global fisheries systems at Michigan State University and a member of MSU’s Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability, will discuss the threat Asian carp pose to the Great Lakes community on the Greening of the Great Lakes radio program.

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